Yale University Library

Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies

The Fortunoff Archive currently holds more than 4,400 testimonies comprising 12,000 recorded hours of videotape.
Explore the Archive

We record the stories of those who were there.

In 1979, a grassroots organization called the Holocaust Survivors Film Project began videotaping Holocaust survivors and witnesses in New Haven, Connecticut. In 1981, the original collection of testimonies was deposited at Yale University and we opened our doors to the public the following year.

Interview with Laurel Vlock and Jolly Z.
Interview with Laurel Vlock and Jolly Z. (HVT-34, HVT-220, HVT-972)
Search Aviary for thousands of testimonies in our archive
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View Testimonies at Yale or at an access site
View Testimonies at Yale or at an access site
The Fortunoff Archive aims to make its collection accessible worldwide.
Excerpts from the Fortunoff Archive
Excerpts from the Fortunoff Archive
View edited programs based on individual testimonies and multiple voices around a theme

A Message from Faculty Advisor Timothy Snyder

The mission of the Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies is to remember. Our survivor testimonies are of distinct individuals, but together they reveal common dangers. The Holocaust was unlike any other crime, and in its bottomless depths we hear the echoes of all human wrongdoing. We know what happens when societies are falsely divided by race, when language is used as a weapon, when lies replace truth. We know what happens when some citizens are treated as second class, when police break their oaths, when high officials endorse lawlessness. We know what happens when no one offers a helping hand, no one raises a voice, no one takes a risk. The call to remember includes remembering that Hitler admired American racism. The call to remember includes remembering that our soldiers defeated Nazi Germany fighting in apartheid units and then returned to a racist country. (Listen to the testimony of Leon Bass) The call to remember means little if we forget our own possibilities for evil and our own responsibility for good. We support those who demonstrate for justice, and we condemn racist murder with utter and absolute abhorrence. It was the Nazis who called upon police and soldiers to be racial warriors. Never again.
 
Sincerely,
 
Timothy Snyder,
Faculty Advisor
Richard C. Levin Professor of History

Leon Bass.
Leon Bass, a U.S. Army soldier who gave testimony to the Fortunoff Archive.
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